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Follow our teams on the ground

22764

MALNOURISHED CHILDREN TREATED

118437

PATIENTS TREATED FOR MALARIA

16596

HOSPITALISATIONS

POPULATION

16,900,000
millions

INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY RATE

102
deaths per 1,000 children

MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE

587
deaths per 100,000 live births

Country context

The security situation in Mali’s northern regions remains unstable. Since 2012, clashes between armed groups have caused populations to be displaced both within Mali and to neighboring countries.

Many people still have very limited access to healthcare, and medical facilities are short of human, material and financial resources.

Malaria is one of the main causes of mortality in the country. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 90% of Mali’s population lives in a high-transmission zone. The country is also characterized by high levels of malnutrition. In 2015, the overall malnutrition rate was 12.4%; the rate of moderate acute malnutrition was 9.6%; and the rate of severe acute malnutrition was 2.8%.

Our partners

ALIMA works with Alliance Médicale Contre le Paludisme (AMCP, Medical Alliance Against Malaria), a Malian NGO dedicated to making healthcare more accessible and reducing malaria-related mortality.

Operations

ALIMA and AMCP support 33 community health centers and two referral health centers – including an operating room – in the Diré and Goudam districts in the Timbuktu region, providing free access to care. In the Goudam district, medical teams in mobile clinics dispense care and distribute drinking water to displaced people.

In 2015, nearly 170,000 consultations, 5,000 hospitalizations, 3,600 births, and 522 surgical procedures were recorded in the Timbuktu region.

In the Koulikoro region, ALIMA and its local partners are working hard to reducing deaths from the leading causes of infant mortality, including malaria, acute respiratory infections, diarrhea and malnutrition. The teams also support 111 community health centers and six referral health centers.

Seasonal malaria chemoprevention campaigns were organized during the rainy season to help prevent malaria. According to the WHO, administering an antimalarial treatment at monthly intervals during this period has been shown to offer 75% protection against uncomplicated and severe malaria in children under five years of age. Nearly 88,000 malaria patients were treated, of whom 6,000 were taken in to hospital.

In Dioïla, in southern Mali, ALIMA opened an intensive nutritional rehabilitation unit to train Malian healthcare workers. They learn to screen for severe acute malnutrition with complications, and how to manage it in a hospital setting. The project has – so far – provided training to 276 nurses and doctors.